Report From Malawi, 1 January 2017

On Christmas Day, 2016, a group of five young adults and I embarked on an African adventure that was over two years in the making.  Carly, Katie, Joe, Rachael, David and I are pleased to be in Malawi for nearly two weeks embracing (and being embraced by) the gift that is the partnership between the churches of Pittsburgh Presbytery (Presbyterian Church USA) and Blantyre Synod (Church of Central Africa: Presbyterian).  Here is part of our story.

Do you know how it is when someone tries to tell you about something, and you think you know what he or she is talking about, and then when you experience it yourself you think, “Wow, so this is what my friend was meaning…”? You know that sometimes you can hear about a thing a hundred times, but when you experience it – well, that’s just different, that’s all?

In our preparation for this journey, I told the team, “You know it gets hot in Ntaja.”

“That’s ok, Dave, it will feel nice after how cold it has been in Pittsburgh.”

“No, I’m telling you, it gets really hot in Ntaja in January.”

“Yeah, great. It’ll be great.”

Even Malawians, upon hearingour plans to spend four days in the community where our sister church is located, would say something like, “Ntaja? Oh, it’s hot there.”

We left Mulanje on the morning of Saturday the 31st and headed for Blantyre. We drove to Blantyre, where the Synod Partnership Steering Committee had organized a lunch for us along with our friends from Ntaja at the Grace Bandawe Conference Center, and then we headed north and east to the trading center of Ntaja. We drove through a landscape peppered with thousands of villages, baobab trees, banana plants, and all kinds of wondrous and unusual sights, and finally arrived in Ntaja shortly before nightfall.

Enjoying a fine lunch at GBCC

Enjoying a fine lunch at GBCC

We reunited with Beatrice Mfune, who got to know the team at the New Wilmington Mission Conference.

We reunited with Beatrice Mfune, who got to know the team at the New Wilmington Mission Conference.

The entire town was experiencing a power outage on our first night, which made getting acquainted with our host families and the new accommodations a little more difficult. Our team had to learn a new style of sleeping (with mosquito nets), a new way of bathing (using water drawn from the borehole and heated over a fire), and all of this took place while it was hot. Did I mention that I anticipated warm weather in Ntaja?

During the day, I would suspect the thermometer climbs to the mid or upper 90s, and at night the outdoor temperature cools somewhat. However, the draperies and closed windows needed to protect sleepers from mosquitos mean that it remains very, very warm indoors at night. I think that the heat has presented our young team with very, very significant challenges. In fact, one member of the team said to me, “You keep talking about being out of our ‘comfort zone’. I need to tell you that I have been uncomfortable in every single way for at least the last thirty hours.”

That said, they have done admirably! One of the last things that Katie saw in 2016, for instance, was a shooting star. One benefit of being in a remote African community in the midst of a power outage is that when it’s dark – it’s DARK. For the first time in her life, she saw a blaze of light streaking across the heavens, and it was a joy.

We attended New Year’s Day worship, which lasted from about 8:40 until about 12:30 or so. There were more choirs than we could count; a significant welcome from the community; and our team was even recruited to be the “honorary deacons” for the day, which meant that for about twenty minutes as the congregation brought forward their offerings, the young missionaries from CHUP collected, counted and recorded the gifts from the various zones within the church.

Preparing for New Year's Day worship in Ntaja.

Preparing for New Year’s Day worship in Ntaja.

Carly summons the worshipers by ringing the church bell.

Carly summons the worshipers by ringing the church bell.

Children's sermon.

Children’s sermon.

Rachael assisting with collecting the Children's Offering.

Rachael assisting with collecting the Children’s Offering.

The best sermon these people have heard all year!

The best sermon these people have heard all year!

Carly reads the scripture.

Carly reads the scripture.

The honorary deacons counting the tithes.

The honorary deacons counting the tithes.

Presenting gifts!

Presenting gifts!

Rose Chitedze shares her thoughts about partnership.

Rose Chitedze shares her thoughts about partnership.

We were treated to a fine meal at the home of Mr. Haiya, who was celebrating his birthday on January 1, and then returned to the church for a three hour meeting with the “Youth Group” of Mbenjere CCAP. In Malawi, membership in the “Youth Group” begins at about age ten and lasts until age 35 – a little different than our experience. There was a wide-ranging discussion on a variety of issues, and each of our young people spoke with poise and clarity. I was very, very proud of them.

Mr. Haiya's birthday celebration!

Mr. Haiya’s birthday celebration!

Rachael speaks to the youth of Mbenjere.

Rachael speaks to the youth of Mbenjere.

Katie interprets the role of youth in Crafton Heights.

Katie interprets the role of youth in Crafton Heights.

Dinner with Fletcher and his family was delicious.

Dinner with Fletcher and his family was delicious.

Our friend Fletcher, who visited CHUP in July 2016, hosted us for dinner, and then we retired for the evening. It was a good day in so many ways, and I commended our team for working through the discomfort that the climate and some of the other new things presented to them and for carrying out this mission of partnership very, very well.

 

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