Report from Malawi – 8 January 2017

On Christmas Day, 2016, a group of five young adults and I embarked on an African adventure that was over two years in the making.  Carly, Katie, Joe, Rachael, David and I are pleased to be in Malawi for nearly two weeks embracing (and being embraced by) the gift that is the partnership between the churches of Pittsburgh Presbytery (Presbyterian Church USA) and Blantyre Synod (Church of Central Africa: Presbyterian).  Here is part of our story.

Having been refreshed by time at the lake and as a team, on Saturday morning 7 January we headed south to explore the last two days of our time in Malawi. As we drove from Mangochi to Blantyre, we made several stops. One of these was at the Naming’azi Farm Training Center. This is a demonstration farm and educational facility used by the Synod of Blantyre to help local farmers learn the best techniques for animal husbandry, crop rotation, natural weed and moisture management, and more. Because a significant partnership has recently ended, there is not much actively going on at Naming’azi at the moment, but it remains one of the best ideas going – God’s people grappling with issues of food production in an era of climate change and increased attentiveness to the problems associated with chemical used in agriculture.

The Naming'azi Farm Training Center sits at the base of the massive Zomba Plateau. Here David and Joe tour with BSHDC Director Lindirabe Gareta

The Naming’azi Farm Training Center sits at the base of the massive Zomba Plateau. Here David and Joe tour with BSHDC Director Lindirabe Gareta

From there we proceeded to the region around Chileka, where we were honored to visit a support group for individuals and families living with HIV/AIDS. The village where we were hosted is one of many that is home to such groups across southern Malawi. The Blantyre Synod Health and Development Commission (BSHDC) invites community members to form such peer groups in order to promote awareness, reduce stigmatization, enhance adherence to drug therapy treatments, and monitor individual concerns at a local level. One concern that has been noted is that many of these families struggle with nutrition, particularly for their children. Using funding provided by Pittsburgh Presbytery’s International Partnership Ministry Team, the BSHDC is making bags of specially-enriched corn flour called Likuni Phala available to families during the “hungry season” of January and February. This flour contains corn, soya, sugar, and vitamins and is extremely effective at forestalling malnutrition (especially in children). We were surprised not only to be present for a distribution, but to have a role in it.

Part of the communal support group for those affected by HIV/AIDS.

Part of the communal support group for those affected by HIV/AIDS.

Sharing some Likuni Phala in the community.

Sharing some Likuni Phala in the community.

One of the benefits of a trip like this is to be able to call attention to challenges and possible responses. Here I am talking with the Malawian Broadcasting System television and radio teams at the food distribution center.

One of the benefits of a trip like this is to be able to call attention to challenges and possible responses. Here I am talking with the Malawian Broadcasting System television and radio teams at the food distribution center.

On Sunday, we achieved our goal of sharing in worship with an urban congregation. Unlike Mbenjere CCAP (where we visited on 1/1), St. Michael and All Angels CCAP is comprised city dwellers who are significantly better educated than the average Malawian and many of whom hold key positions in the nation’s business, governmental, and philanthropic communities. We were asked to provide leadership for the 8:30 service (one of five worship services at St. Michael’s each Sunday), which meant that each of us had a reading, and I preached and led the prayers.

Preaching at St. Michael and All Angels church in Blantyre.

Preaching at St. Michael and All Angels church in Blantyre.

Katie reads from Philippians 1 at St. Michael's.

Katie reads from Philippians 1 at St. Michael’s.

I was delighted to run into Glomicko Munthali, who I believe was the first chair of the Blantyre Synod Partnership Committee in 1991.

I was delighted to run into Glomicko Munthali, who I believe was the first chair of the Blantyre Synod Partnership Committee in 1991.

Following the worship, we were treated to an amazingly delicious Farewell Luncheon hosted by the Blantyre Synod Partnership Steering Committee. During their speeches, members of this body, along with General Secretary the Rev. Alex Maulana, expressed their deep appreciation for the presence of a youth missionary team from Crafton Heights and they expressed a desire that the vision and diligence of this group (especially in terms of fund-raising and preparation) might serve as an encouragement to a group of Malawian young people to embark on a similar journey. A personal highlight of this occasion was the fact that Davies Lanjesi made a special effort to include Mrs. Sophie M’nensa, and she and her grandson Gamaliel were able to join us for both worship at St. Michael’s and the banquet.

With the Revs. Billy Gama and Alex Maulana along with Davies and Angella Lanjesi at the farewell luncheon.

With the Revs. Billy Gama and Alex Maulana along with Davies and Angella Lanjesi at the farewell luncheon.

With Sophie and Gama after the luncheon.

With Sophie and Gama after the luncheon.

Continuing to tell the partnership story: here Rachael and I are interviewed by Blantyre Synod Radio.

Continuing to tell the partnership story: here Rachael and I are interviewed by Blantyre Synod Radio.

Our travels concluded with a stop to visit my old friends Silas and Margaret Ncozana in their modern/traditional Ngoni-inspired home in the Chigumula area. Here, we shared much laughter, deep appreciation for the work of partnership in our own lives, and an expression of the challenge that lies in front of all who would serve the Lord and his people. The young people were grateful for the Ncozana’s hospitality and humor; they listened to a few more stories about the old days in the partnership, and heard Silas charge them to become leaders in the days to come. It was a beautiful ending to a good and rich journey.

Sharing time with Silas and Margaret!

Sharing time with Silas and Margaret!

Silas shared with us the Ngoni tradition in which he said that anyone who was a witch was forbidden to enter the home. Each of us drank from the gourd - and a witch would die immediately. We all lived, and later discovered that the beverage was a home brew made from baobab fruit.

Silas shared with us the Ngoni tradition in which he said that anyone who was a witch was forbidden to enter the home. Each of us drank from the gourd – and a witch would die immediately. We all lived, and later discovered that the beverage was a home brew made from baobab fruit.

As we prepare to pack and weigh our bags in preparation for the longest flight these young people have ever known, we are filled with appreciation for the opportunities we have had, and we ask your continued prayers as we seek to continue to learn from and grow into these challenges. I will say again that I cannot imagine this trip having gone better – the hospitality was amazing, the team was pliable and energetic, we grew in our understanding of so much – it was all simply beautiful. I hope that these few blog postings have given you at least a little bit of a window into the richness of this experience for this team. Thank you so much!

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