The Power of One

The people at the First U.P. Church of Crafton Heights are spending much of 2017-2018 in an exploration of the Gospel of Mark. On May 13, 2018, we considered the reunion that Jesus had with his disciples after their “mission trips”, the feeding of the 5,000, and the power of one individual to make a difference.  Our texts were Mark 6:30-44 and Colossians 4:2-6.

To hear this sermon as preached in worship, please use the media browser below, or past the following URL into your browser: https://castyournet.files.wordpress.com/2018/05/scene1_2018-05-13_11-28-11_t001_in1.mp3
Those who listen to the sermon will hear a special introduction about standing on tiptoe whilst reading scripture.

As we begin the next installment of our walk through the Gospel of Mark this morning, let me tell you about two men of whom you’ve probably never heard.  Each is an amazing testament to the power of the individual to accomplish that which we might think to be impossible.

Dean Karnazes is a 55 year old man from California who likes to run.  A lot.  I know that many of you in the congregation this morning took part in some part of last week’s Pittsburgh Marathon, and so you might be impressed if I told you that in 2006, Mr. Karnazes ran 50 complete marathons.  You might be more impressed if I told you that he ran those 50 marathons on 50 consecutive days, and each was in a different state.  And yet what cements this man in my Hall of Fame for individual achievements is the fact that on Wednesday morning, October 12, 2005, he dropped his kids off at school in San Francisco and started running.  He ran and ran and ran – for 80 hours and 44 minutes, without sleeping, weaving his way through Northern California, until he arrived at Stanford University in Palo Alto, having covered 350 miles.

On the other side of the world, a gentleman named Dashrath Manjhi tells us a different story of individual achievement.  In 1959, this landless peasant farmer’s wife, Falguni Devi, died because she was unable to obtain medical care. People in her village had to follow a path that wound for 70 kilometers (43 ½ miles) to get to the clinic.  In 1960, Mr. Manji took a hammer and a chisel and started to attack the rock hillside that separated the village from the clinic.  He worked by himself until 1982 to carve a path through the Gehlour hills.  When he was finished, he’d reduced the distance from 70 kilometers to one – just over half a mile.

I’m telling you these stories because I want you to think about the limits of possibility for one person.  What can one man, one woman, do?  And what difference does it make?

At this point, I’m going to interrupt this sermon for a geography lesson, because understanding the whereof today’s Gospel is crucial to our ability to process the whatand the how.

If you’ve ever traveled, you’ve probably had a conversation with someone that goes something like this: “Oh, you’re from Pennsylvania? My cousin lives in Pennsylvania. His name is James… Maybe you know him?”

When this happens, we roll our eyes and quietly judge that person for being a complete moron, and then three days later we meet someone from Malawi and say, “Oh, Malawi? Yeah, I’ve got friends there, and my pastor goes there all the time.  Do you know a guy named Fletcher?”

Here’s a quick review of the geography of Mark’s gospel.  Jesus began his ministry in that part of Palestine known as the Galilee. This was a strongly Jewish-influenced area that was north of the capital, Jerusalem, and west of the Jordan river.  Nearly all of the significant action in the first three years of Jesus’ ministry takes place in Galilean communities like Nazareth, Capernaum, Bethsaida, and Cana.

Even though it was removed from the center of Jewish life in Jerusalem, Galilee was a stronghold of the faith.  It was surrounded by non-Jewish areas like Samaria, Phoenicia, and the region of the Decapolis.  These names don’t sound much different to you and to me than the towns where Jesus worked, but I’m here to tell you that if I was a good little Jewish boy driving through the Decapolis at that time, my mother would tell me to lock the doors and avoid eye contact.  Good and faithful Galileans did everything they could to stay in Galilee, and when they had to go to Jerusalem to worship, they stayed close to the Jordan River and went that way.

Most of Jesus’ ministry, in terms of time and area, took place in and around the Galilee. The deepest parts of Jesus’ ministry, including his crucifixion and resurrection, happened in Jerusalem.  And yet some of the most amazing testimony to the power of Jesus’ comes to us from the detours he made to “the other side” – those regions outside of either Galilee or Jerusalem.

Today’s reading picks up a narrative that was left off earlier in Chapter six.  Jesus is hard at work in his ministry with the disciples in the Galilee.  You might remember that he’d just finished a visit to his own hometown in Nazareth when he sent the twelve disciples out to visit the other communities in that region. There’s an interlude during which Jesus reflects on the suffering and death of John the Baptist, and then the twelve return to him, eager to report on what they’d seen and done.

The Exhortation to the Apostles, James Tissot (c. 1890)

He sees their enthusiasm, and suggests that they all go on a retreat.  Various translations tell us that they’re looking for a quiet, or a solitary, or a deserted place.  They get into the boat and sail across the Sea of Galilee into the Decapolis.

So far as we know from Mark, the team had been there at least once before.  You might remember that back in Chapter 5 they went and visited the graveyard and met the man who was beset by demons.  Jesus healed the man, but in the process wound up sending a couple of thousand pigs off the side of a cliff and the local authorities came out and asked him to take his religion back to his side of the sea.  The only man there who actually wanted to be with Jesus at that point was the man who had been healed, and Jesus didn’t allow him to join the mission; instead, he told the man to “Go home to your own people and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.”

So it might seem to the disciples that this was a fair presumption – if they were looking for a little “down” time with Jesus, if there is anyplace that they could go to be alone, well, it’s there.  The people in that part of the world hated Jesus last time he was here.

Except that’s not exactly how it works out, is it? We read in verse 32 that as they were arriving in this “deserted” and “solitary” place, they were recognized.  In fact, Mark tells us that “a large crowd” gathered there. The disciples, who were irritated and hungry to begin with, take this as long as they can, but finally interrupt Jesus and say, “Send these people away.”

Jesus responds, as you’ve heard, by saying, “We’ll do no such thing.  In fact, why don’t you go ahead and feed them.”

The Twelve are incredulous at this point. “Us? Here? How? It’s not likely – no, it’s not possible, Jesus.”

Christ Feeding the 5000, Eric Feather (http://ericfeather.com/index.html)

[3]And Jesus says, “Here, hold my wineskin…”, and the result, as you’ve heard, is the feeding of the 5,000 – the only miracle to be mentioned in all four of the Gospels.

I’m here to point out that this miraculous feeding of the nearly-uncountable throng was all made possible because one person did what Jesus had asked him to do.  It was not, apparently, what the person had wantedto do; we’ve already acknowledged that the man who seemingly told everyone he knew about what Jesus had done for him would have preferred to become the 13thdisciple.  Yet when Jesus told him to stay put and offer testimony to the work of the Holy One in his life, well, that’s what he did.

I don’t want the significance of this event to be lost on us.  I mean, we don’t even know this person’s name – but somehow, his presence in that region allowed for a transition from “Jesus! Will you please get out of there now, and take your disciples with you!” to “Oh, wow! Thank God! You’re here.  Jesus is here.  He’s really here!”

What is the vehicle for that transition?  What allowed that to happen?  Go back and scrutinize the events that took place between Mark 5:19 and Mark 6:30, and you’ll see that Jesus’ ministry of teaching and miracle-working was essentially unchanged.  He didn’t do anything after 5:19 that he hadn’t already been doing.

But the behavior of those who followed him hadchanged.  The one man who had been healed had gone “to tell in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him…and all the people were amazed…”  The twelve whom Jesus had kept with him had walked through their fear in order to bear witness to the power of the Christ in their own homes and communities.

Do you see what’s happening here?  In this section of the Gospel of Mark, Jesus is talking about crossing boundaries and is calling his followers to do so; once they are on “the other side”, he simply urges them to “tell… how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you…”

The one man in the region who had been healed had quite a story to tell.

So do you.

In what ways has the life, death, resurrection, love, and presence of Jesus of Nazareth touched your life?

I know that some of you have had some really splashy healings from addiction, or depression, or abuse, or other form of brokenness.

And I know that others in this room have experienced significant shifts of the heart as the power and presence of the Lord has grown in your own lives.

In any case, the core narrative of the follower of Jesus who has experienced any growth in her or his own life is pretty much the same: at the end of the day, we can look in the mirror and say, “You know, I used to be that way…but now it’s more like this…”

To put it another way, each of us has a narrative that could be expressed by filling in these blanks: “I once was _____, but now I’m ______.”

If you were asked what words you’d use in that phrase, which would you choose?  In what ways has God positioned you to speak of your experience in the places where you’ve been?

And you say, “Yeah, about that, Pastor Dave.  Look, I’m not really much of a speaker.  And I’m not one of those zealots, fundies, or born-agains.  I hate to speak in public…  I just don’t think I can tell a story like that.”

Listen: bearing witness to the ways that you have grown and changed is not a super-human feat of individual strength and perseverance akin to running 350 miles without a nap or building a road through the mountain with a hammer.  You don’t need special training.  More importantly, you are never, ever alone.

The charge for today is for you to consider how you have experienced the power of the risen Christ. You, in the midst of your community, surrounded by others who have stories that are similar to, yet not the same as, yours – have had the opportunity to grow in faith.  This week, will you take an hour or so to contemplate the ways that your experience of this life is richer, deeper, better, or has more integrity because of the presence of Jesus in that life?

And then, will you find a way to bear witness to that enriching, deepening, improving, or empowering in your daily life?  Can you do as Jesus asked that man in the Decapolis two thousand years ago: can you “tell… how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you…”? Share your reflections with someone who is close to you.  Be present in the life and worship of this and other communities.  Look for ways in which you can take part in new ministries in ways that shape and stretch you.

My sense is that when we are able to do this, we will find that we, no less than the bread that Jesus broke on that hillside, will be far more nourishing and effective than any one of us might have predicted.

What is your story? And who have you told?

Beware!

For much of 2015/2016, God’s people at The First U.P. Church of Crafton Heights are seeking to be attentive to Christ’s call to follow as expressed in the Sermon on the Mount. On May 22 we listened to the words of Jesus as he warned about the dangers of, well, people who use words inappropriately.  The text was Matthew 7:15-23 and our epistle reading was I Corinthians 13:1-7.

 

Assorted Magnetic WordsI like to talk.

Wow! Tell us something we didn’t know, Dave! Wake the kids – call the neighbors! Dave likes to talk!

All right – this isn’t really news. You like to talk, too. At least some times, you recognize the value and the importance of the spoken word. You can get a lot done with words, can’t you?

You can ask for directions when you’re in a strange part of town. I can call my insurance agent when I’ve suffered a loss. Without words, we wouldn’t have the chance to share that great joke. And you can bet that I use words when my granddaughter calls me and shrieks, “Grampy’s available!”

In many, many situations, there is simply no substitute for talking. You just need a face to face conversation when you’re covering important relational ground, don’t you? Who wants to break up via text message, or hear second-hand about a friend’s plans to move? Sometimes, you have to just sit down and talk – use words to express what is really happening in and with your life. We have to talk.

And yet, as you well know, talk can be cheap, too. This is really easy to point to in this year of the primary elections. How many times have you heard someone say, “My opponent is the biggest nincompoop in the history of nincompoopery! I would not trust him to change the light bulb in the janitor’s closet! I could not warm up to her if we were cremated together…” You know what I mean, right? I mean, they are attacking each other. With words.

blahblahAnd then two or three weeks later, the same person will say, “My esteemed opponent has clearly demonstrated the kind of vigor that makes our community great, and I am happy to endorse her… I am honored to be considered as his running mate…”

Who are you?  What happened to the nincompoop? How easy is it to change our tune so quickly? The words are meaningless here.

Or consider when politicians or preachers rail against greed or pornography or some other wickedness, only to be caught six months later in some sordid affair or deep shame of their own. Their words say one thing, and yet they act in a manner that is the direct opposite. And we shake our heads and say, “Well, talk is cheap.”

Sermon on the Mount, Karoly Ferenczy (1896)

Sermon on the Mount, Karoly Ferenczy (1896)

This morning we near the completion of our study of some of the greatest words ever recorded: Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount. For several chapters, the Lord has given some concrete instructions as to how to live as a faithful follower in difficult times. Several weeks ago, we heard him discuss the “Golden Rule” and talked about the fact that discipleship can be a tough row to hoe.

As he approaches his conclusion, he looks at the twelve disciples and, with increasing seriousness, continues to use words to point to a great truth. And the words today are those of warning. Beware! Watch out! Danger ahead!

The threat to which the Lord points most vividly here in Matthew 7 is that of false prophets. If we’re going to consider that today, we need to remember what a prophet is in the world of the Bible.

A prophet is someone who tells the truth; a speaker who uses words to reveal something of God’s intentions to the world or to a community. While we often think of the prophet’s job as to foretell the future, the reality is that more often than not prophets in scripture talk about the paths that God’s people ought to follow as well as the outcomes that our current behaviors and decisions are likely to produce.

In the bible, people like Jeremiah and Isaiah speak the truth of God in their prophecies, urging people to care for the poor, to stand up for the marginalized, to stay faithful to God, or risk the consequences. John the Baptist called people to turn their lives around and to embrace the reconciliation that God offers to those who seek it. The book of Acts tells of a man named Agabus who is called a prophet because he predicted a famine would encompass parts of the Middle East and he urged people to help those who would struggle.

Each of these men is revealed to be a “true prophet” because he tells it like it is and allows us to glimpse something of how our present behaviors intersect with future conditions and they offer us ideas as to how to plan our behaviors accordingly. That’s what prophets – true prophets – do. They tell the truth. And then they live the truth.

And as he nears the completion of the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus cautions against a number of false prophets who will appear. Given our understanding of what makes someone a “true” prophet, then, I think we can understand that a falst prophet is one who does not reveal truth, or who provides horrible advice about dealing with the truth, or who speaks contrary to the intentions and purposes of God.

Think with me, for a moment, about the astounding number of false prophets at work in the world and in your life today.

  • What about the financial planner who takes it as a given that your number one priority in life is to take care of number one? Who insists that it is impossible to have “enough” and who encourages you to invest your money in schemes that will indeed amass wealth – but only as a result of unfair treatment of workers or risking the health of the environment? Isn’t that person a “false prophet?”
  • What about the so-called “friend” who sees you going through a tough time and shares your pain for a while, and then invites you to escape that pain with just one little rush of heroin?
  • What about the co-worker who insists that you have nothing to worry about – because “everybody cheats on their time cards”?

Each of these, and a thousand others that you could name, are indeed false prophets – that is, they are people who pretend to know something about how the world works and offer you advice as to how to engage that world with your life. But as bad as these people are, they are not the targets of Jesus’ warnings here.

Jesus calls for particular vigilance when it comes to those who claim to be religious, who seek to speak for God, and yet whose character reveals them to be disconnected with the intentions of God in the world. The church leader who advocates humility but who craves glory; the preacher who thunders on and on about “family values” but is revealed as an adulterer; the person who uses gossip and innuendo and fear to breed doubt and distrust and racism among the body of Christ…

This is a little awkward for me to talk about right now, but I think that Jesus is saying that while you are listening to me or anyone else ramble on and on about what Jesus might say or where the Holy Spirit is moving in your life, you need to be taking some time to think about whether I am a true or a false prophet.

When my mother was presented with a tidbit of information that she found to be either unsettling or implausible, she would simply say, “Well, consider the source…” She was not interested in taking advice on successful relationships from Elizabeth Taylor or Hugh Hefner, for instance (if you don’t know who those people are, think of Kim Kardashian or John Mayer). My mother taught me to look for evidence of character in the lives of people to whom I pay attention, and that advice has served me well over the years.

Who are the people to whom you listen when no one is looking at them? Do the things that they say line up with the things that they do? And if there is a consistency in their saying and doing, does that in fact point to the heart of God?

The bottom line is that, as you know, talk is cheap. Before you allow someone to influence you and your actions, pause to “consider the source”. Is that person someone with credibility and integrity? As that person speaks to you about what God wants you to do with your life, your energy, your money – is there any sign that he or she is being faithful with his or her life, energy, or money?

As he wraps up the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus is saying to his followers, “Look, I’m using words – a lot of them – to try to emphasize the way that life is, or should be. When we get up from this mountain, watch me. Look at the fruit in my life. See how I live this life. Am I someone who can be trusted? Do I live into this ethic that I’m asking you to follow? If I do, then don’t seek merely to follow me or to be attentive to me – seek to know me. Don’t just listen to me. Don’t just repeat what I say. Come with me. Be like me. Know me.  Love me.  Love like I do.”

I think that’s what Paul is getting at in the reading you’ve heard from his letter to the Corinthians. I know that when you hear this passage, it’s most often at a wedding, but it’s not about marriage, you know. It’s about the people who claim to be part of the body of Christ but who do not act that way at all. The mark of a true Christian, says Paul, is love. I may talk a good game; I might have a slew of impressive receipts listed on my tax returns; I may be the most gifted person in the history of gifts… but if I don’t live into any of that with love in my heart, then not only am I useless – I clearly know nothing of Jesus.

So by all means, beloved, consider the source as you listen to the ending of this week’s sermon. Look at my life and see if you can discover evidence of love or grace or faith or hope or – most importantly – Jesus. And do this, not only with me, but with everyone else that you listen to, so that you might avoid false prophets.

But know this, dear friends; beware and be alert! The people who listen to you talk about what you believe and who you worship… they’ll be doing the same thing. They’ll want to know, before they listen to a word you say, whether you are moving in the direction towards which you are pointing. Or is it just talk?

Listen. Follow. And love. For God’s sake, people, Love. Love Jesus. Love your neighbor. Love yourself. Show the world that you – and the One whom we are here to worship – can be trusted. Thanks be to God. Amen.

For Crying Out Loud (Texas Mission 2015 #3)

While my wife and I were having dinner at a nice restaurant one evening,  we ran into a woman who had shared some pretty painful things with me in the past.  As we greeted each other, I asked how she’d been that day.  She burst into tears and asked if we could talk further at a later date.  Later, at a movie theatre, a similar scene unfolded with a different person.  When we got home, my wife said, “So how often do you have a conversation with people who simply start crying like that?”

Hey, it happens.

It happened today.  Wonderfully, beautifully, amazingly, today.

Sharing a meal with the family on whose home we are privileged to work.

Sharing a meal with the family on whose home we are privileged to work.

We are here along the Texas/Mexico border working with our friends at First Presbyterian Church of Mission and Solomon’s Porch Faith Community to help establish the poor in decent housing.  The welcome we have received has been inspiring, to say the least.  People are literally lining up to feed us, for one thing.  They are listening to our stories, and telling a few of theirs.  And smiling.  Oh, it is beautiful.

I mentioned in yesterday’s post that God seems to care about bodies, the way that we care for them, and the ways that we are His body.  That theme emerged again today in marvelous ways.  Listen:

A meal like this puts a smile  on everyone's face!

A meal like this puts a smile on everyone’s face!

The homeowners of the small three bedroom house on which we are working asked if they could share a meal with us as a way to express their gratitude for the work that we’ve done.  Of course, the answer to that is always “YES!” The two families got together and fixed a huge dish of carne asada, arroz dojo, frijoles a la charr, and tortillas, along with home-made churro cookies.  If that was all that would have happened, it would’ve been enough.

After dinner, I asked one of the young women in the family, sixteen- or seventeen-year-old L, about the shirt she was wearing.  She told me about her high school (the source of the shirt) and then about how much she liked her church.  As she spoke, she made several references to the fact that no matter where they lived, she felt like it was her duty and privilege to make sure that her younger siblings got to church.  I asked a simple question: “Can you tell me about what makes your faith so important to you that you feel the need to share it in this way?”

Sharing stories…

That’s when the tears started.  “I have to!”, she said.  “God has been there for me all the time – since I was born.  There has never been a time when he has left me.”  She told me that when she was born her intestine was tangled around her other internal organs and she was facing certain death, until a Mexican surgeon was convinced to attempt the risky surgery.  There were actually two little girls with the same syndrome who received the operation that night, and each set of parents was told that there was a 10% survival rate.  The other little girl died, but L survived, only to face another challenge: she needed a blood transfusion but there was not a suitable donor in her village.  An uncle arrived in town late that evening, got tested, and proved to be a perfect match.  She needed two such transfusions.

Not long afterward, she developed complications, requiring a second surgery.  Her parents had to beg a doctor even to look at her – most told them to plan her funeral and think about other children.  Finally someone agreed to try – and again, met with success.

Here's a rare shot: Tim captivating a group of children.  Hmmm.

Here’s a rare shot: Tim captivating a group of children. Hmmm.

Through her tears, my friend related episode after episode in her life where she saw the hand of God unmistakably.  Some readers might recall the story I told about the visit to a UN Camp in South Sudan where a young girl sang plaintively wondering whether God had forgotten her.  L‘s story became for me the other side of that coin as she said, “I know that God has never ever left me.  My parents, my family, the doctors – everyone was getting ready to give up on me.  But God never has.  And God never will.  How can I not share that kind of love with my little sisters and brother?  I do not do these things because I think I can pay God back, or because I want to make God love me – I do them because I love God so much for every day I have been given.”

I was privileged to share with her a story from my own past wherein I, too, learned the reality that there are no guarantees, and that all we can do is celebrate each heartbeat knowing that God alone knows how and when this part of our story ends.  You may not be surprised to learn that she was not the only one crying at this point.

Yes, that’s right, you get me talking about important things and I can be a red hot mess.  That’s who I am.

We closed our conversation by remembering the words of the Psalmist, who wrote

Though my father and mother forsake me,
    the Lord will receive me…
I remain confident of this:
    I will see the goodness of the Lord
    in the land of the living.
Wait for the Lord;
    be strong and take heart
    and wait for the Lord. (Psalm 27:10, 13-14)

It was a wonderful, beautiful, amazing day.  Thanks be to God.

Oh, and we also did a lot of painting, drywalling, and construction-y stuff.  That part went fine, too.

IMG_4282

Jon smoothing things out on the site. He’s all about finesse.

 

We call Bob Walters "B-O-B"  and our worksite liaison "Texas Bob" or "Tejano Bob".  They are both blessings!

We call Bob Walters “B-O-B” and our worksite liaison “Texas Bob” or “Tejano Bob”. They are both blessings!

 

 

 

This may be the first time we've ever been able to put  a finish coat of paint on a project.  It's a good feeling!

This may be the first time we’ve ever been able to put a finish coat of paint on a project. It’s a good feeling!

Did someone say she wanted a ROJO bedroom?  Mission accomplished.

Did someone say she wanted a ROJO bedroom? Mission accomplished.